Flares / Flare Combusters

Flare-rev

Coughlin Equipment manufactures highly reliable gas flares with a state of the art control system designed to make Start, Stop, Low temp and High temp settings easy to manage.

Key features include:

  • Log the date, time, flow, pressure and flare temperature as they occur
  • All logged data can be easily downloaded to USB drive for further analysis
  • Our burner system is “instant light”, which prevents the ball of flame generated by other flares when gas is allowed to build up or accumulate prior to being ignited
  • Continuous pilot light
  • Electronic ignition

Easy to use, continual logging of vital information related to the well operation, easily downloaded data, variable log intervals … all reasons why our controller represents industry leading technology.

Our flare controllers incorporate the following features not found with all flare manufacturers:

  • We log the date, time, flow, pressure and flare temperature as they occur
  • All logged data can be easily downloaded to USB drive for further analysis
  • Our burner system is “instant light”, eliminating the ball of flame generated by some flares that allow gas to build up before being ignited

Well site flares and tank vent flares currently operate in most major conventional and unconventional oil and gas gathering fields today. With the increasing exploration of shale formations around the globe, flares have become a smart solution to completing wells quickly and effectively while staying in compliance with environmental regulations. Coughlin Equipment flares handle the high pressure well head separator / heater treater flows, as well as low pressure tank battery vent gases commonly found on most well locations.

About Flaring
Flaring is the controlled burning of natural gas in the course of routine oil and gas production operations. This burning occurs at the end of a flare stack or boom.
A flare is normally visible and generates both noise and heat. During flaring, the burned gas generates mainly water vapour and carbon dioxide. Efficient combustion in the flame depends on achieving good mixing between the fuel gas and air, and on the absence of liquids. The percentage combustion efficiency of a well designed and operated flare is in the high ninety percent range. Recent work by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has shown that combustion efficiencies are often greater than 98%. http://www.ogp.org.uk/pubs/288.pdf